The Dutch influence on embroidery on paper

I have been designing stitching cards for over ten years but the origins of the craft go back a long way in history. Card has probably been used as a base material for embroidery since card itself was first produced. In the 1800s sheets of perforated paper became available to needle crafters. This started the Victorian craze for stitching mottoes and sayings on card. Designs were usually worked in long parallel stitches to form areas of colour.

Today’s card embroidery designs are typically worked in long crossing stitches that form geometric shapes. In the early 1990s Dutch designer Erica Fortgens started writing books with instructions and patterns for making stitching cards using geometric shapes.

In the forward to her book “Embroidery on Paper” Erica Fortgens tells how she got started.

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Why string art is the granddaddy of prick and stitch card making

Way back in the swinging 1960s I was given a string art kit for Christmas. The kit had silver string, black felt for the background, a backing board and lots of nails. The picture was a sailing boat. I had great fun making the picture and it hung proudly in the hall for many years.

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The 10 best selling Stitching Cards value packs ever

My post featuring the 10 best selling individual stitching cards patterns has proved to be popular with visitors so now I present the 10 best selling value packs on the Stitching Cards web site ever. Please keep in mind that the value packs that have been on sale the longest stand a better chance of getting into the top ten.

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Stitching cards in the Form-A-Lines forum gallery

My Form-A-Lines forum has a number of enthusiastic greetings card stitchers among its members. I can recommend a visit to the new cards section of the gallery this week as it contains several beautiful stitching cards.

Strawberr“Strawberry” by Eileen Scott is a gorgeous combination of stitching, decoupage and cutting.

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Improvising a pricking mat for stitching cards

If you are making a lot of cards with the prick and stitch method it is well worth getting one of the purpose made pricking mats that will be sold by your favourite craft store. Pricking mats are usually made from compressed fibre, felt or polyurethane foam. The size will be around 9 x 6 inches (22 x 16 centimetres) and ½ inch (1 centimetre) thick.

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Free stitching card corner scroll pattern

Corner scroll card with an iris picture.This corner scroll pattern is easy to stitch directly on to a greetings card. The simple design is worked in stem stitch. The photograph below shows the scrolls on a hammered cream card stitched in green thread. I have added a photograph of an iris that I took in my garden. You could add a picture with decoupage, rubber stamping, teabag folding etc.

Corner scroll card with an iris picture.The corner scrolls could also be used on a square card by repositioning the pricking pattern…