How to protect your embroidered cards in the post

When your card goes in the post it will pass automatic sorting machines that have a series of guide rollers. It may be turned around sharp bends and squashed in the franking machine. Not to mention the rough time it may have in the mail sack.

If your delicate stitch work or bead work has only the paper envelope to protect it there is a good possibility that it may suffer.

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Improvising a pricking mat for stitching cards

If you are making a lot of cards with the prick and stitch method it is well worth getting one of the purpose made pricking mats that will be sold by your favourite craft store. Pricking mats are usually made from compressed fibre, felt or polyurethane foam. The size will be around 9 x 6 inches (22 x 16 centimetres) and ½ inch (1 centimetre) thick.

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Finding a substitute pricking tool

You want to try the prick and stitch technique but do not want to spend out on a purpose made pricking tool until you are sure you will enjoy this card making technique. The solution is to look for a sharp pointed object that you already own. Here are some suggestions:

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What is the difference between backstitch and stem stitch?

Two different names for a method of stitching that at first glance seems to do the same job. So what is the difference?

On backstitch more thread ends up hidden on the back of the work than on the front. Stem stitch is the opposite, more thread is visible on the front of the work than on the back. I often wonder why the opposite to backstitch was not called front stitch.

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The crossing fill stitch

This post looks at a method of stitching that is often used to fill areas and shapes with colour. I call it the crossing fill stitch as that is what it does. I try to work this method of stitching into my pattern designs as it gives an attractive finish and is popular with stitching card makers.

The instructions for this stitch often read as follows:

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What thread do I use for my stitching cards?

A question I am often asked by friends who want to try prick ‘n stitch card making is what thread do you use? The answer is Kreinik metallic 1 ply cord.

This is the thread I use to test stitch the patterns on the Stitching Cards web site.

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