Embroidery on paper – a beginners guide to card making with stitching

People who receive hand stitched greetings cards are usually amazed and delighted that someone has made it especially for them. Many have been so pleased that they frame the picture. As well as giving pleasure, embroidery on paper is also an enjoyable way of passing the time. Since only a small amount of equipment needed, it is very portable and can be done almost anywhere. Here are five easy steps to get you started.

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How to reduce the size of your pricking pattern for delicate results

One of my blog readers, Jackie Welch, has sent me a picture of a card she has made with a reduced size pattern. Jackie says “I am quite pleased at how delicate the design looks”. If you fancy having a go at this it is easy to reduce the size by changing the print settings in Adobe Reader.

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How to convert fan stitch to loop stitch on a leaf

Stitched leaves often employ a fan style stitch where most of the thread goes from points on the rim of the leaf into a single hole where it joins the stem. This can easily be converted to a loop stitch using the same holes but having much less thread on the back of the card.

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How to find the correct hole to stitch from the back of the card

stitch from the backAs you know 50% of the work is stitched from the back of your card and 50% is stitched from the front. The stitching diagram shows you the view of the front of the card. When you turn the card over to work from the back you get a reverse image of the pattern. If you are working on a circle or line it is easy to see which hole to use next. However, if you are working on an area with random dots it becomes more of a challenge…

What else do you do whilst stitching cards?

needle-and-threadPeople sometimes ask if I do my own stitching when I design a card. The answer is that I do stitch them myself. I see it as part of the design process. It enables me to refine the design by having first hand knowledge of how it is working. This brings me to the subject of what else do you do whilst stitching a card.

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How to work the ‘S’ curve stitch

When a pattern includes an S shaped curve that is worked with evenly spaced stitches along its length it is hard to visualise. The section where the curve changes from an inside curve to an outside curve is the tricky part.

Once you realise how it works it is just a matter of continuing the stitching and the shape will form itself. However, if you try to analyse it in advance you may find it confusing.

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